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Kakava Amphorae Yard

“Kakava” is an extended ancient wrecks site, once believed to be a submerged village. There is an abundance of amphorae, primarily from Roman era wrecks with at least one from 2nd century BC. Around the reef more evidence of ancient to modern day wrecks are present, such as steel ship parts and huge coal pieces, marking the resting place of an unknown steamboat. Schools of damselfish hover against the current attracting predators such as snappers, Mediterranean barracudas and amberjacks. Parrotfish, brown meagres, groupers, scorpionfish and octopuses occupy every recess and crevice along the reef. The dive site is situated between the two main nesting beaches for Loggerhead sea turtles around Kefalonia “Kaminia” and “Skala”, so chances to catch sight of one looking for her next meal, are quite high.

The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m, appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

 

 

Giant Rudder Wreck

At the eastern edge of Kakava Shoals and within an extended meadow of  Neptune’s seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) a  surprise awaits for divers to discover; the remains of an unidentified shipwreck. Huge riveted steel plates indicate that the vessel was built prior to WWII, when welding for shipbuilding wasn’t the settled method. Among shaft and winch parts the most impressive feature is the giant rudder of the ship that lies virtually intact. The steel pieces create a small artificial reef in the middle of seagrass where saddled and white seabreams, all kinds of wrasses, parrotfish and damselfish find shelter, whilst quite often predators like amberjacks and red snappers and also loggerhead turtles are visitors.

The average depth or the dive is 7 m, while the max is 10 m, appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C in summer months. Occasionally a substantial surface current may be encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

Mazi Wall

Located at Ithaca’s southwestern coast, there is the protected inlet of Mazi, that since ancient times gives shelter to sailors from the prevailing NW wind. An evidence for this is the scuttered ancient amphora in the inlet. The vivid coastal reef is full of all kinds of small fishvivid coastal reef is full of all kinds of small fish, nudibranch, crustaceans and moray eels for divers and underwater photographers to discover. Suddenly divers discover that there is drop forming a steep wall. Around the depth of 35 meters, large tube worms taking advantage of the currents as do huge schools of damselfish. Behind the clouds of the small fish, divers can spot Goldblotch groupers larking to prey on the schools of damselfish. Depending on the season, large groups of amberjacks or bonitos flashing like silver arrows through the blue to attack the defend less damselfish.

The average depth of the dive is 15 m, while the max is 35 m, appropriate for advanced level divers. The visibility is usually greater than 30 m and temperature ranges between 17-25 °C in summer months, depending on depth. Occasionally a mild current may be encountered at the tip of the wall. Boat ride duration 25′.