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Kakava Amphorae Yard

“Kakava” is an extended ancient wrecks site, once believed to be a submerged village. There is an abundance of amphorae, primarily from Roman era wrecks with at least one from 2nd century BC. Around the reef more evidence of ancient to modern day wrecks are present, such as steel ship parts and huge coal pieces, marking the resting place of an unknown steamboat. Schools of damselfish hover against the current attracting predators such as snappers, Mediterranean barracudas and amberjacks. Parrotfish, brown meagres, groupers, scorpionfish and octopuses occupy every recess and crevice along the reef. The dive site is situated between the two main nesting beaches for Loggerhead sea turtles around Kefalonia “Kaminia” and “Skala”, so chances to catch sight of one looking for her next meal, are quite high.

The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m, appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

 

 

Killer Reef

Where Kakava reefs meet their southwestern boundaries there is a shallow rocky plateau before water depth drop. Broken amphorae and metal pieces of yet undisclosed ancient and modern wrecks is the evidence of maritime accidents through thousands of years. The elevated reef streams the open sea swell to strong currents, attracting huge schools of damselfish and picarels and their predators, snappers and amberjacks that often dash from the depth on their prey. Countless holes and crevices give shelter to crabs, scorpionfish, moray eels and Triton’s trumpet shells. However this is apparently the perfect habitant for the countless Pilgrim Hervia nudibranch that love rocky bottoms and slopes in clear and well-oxygenated water. Their abundance and the shallow depth of the dive makes it the perfect site for ambitious macro u/w photographers.

The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m, appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C in summer months. Occasionally a medium surface current may be encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

 

Antisamos Roman Wreck

Some 2000 years ago, the journey of a Roman ship seeking shelter in picturesque Antisamos Bay ended tragically with a crash at the sharp rocks at the north of the bay. Since then, all kinds of gobies, scorpionfish, moray eels, parrot fish, octopus, nudibranch and many more marine species have claimed the cargo’s hundreds of amphorae as a habitant. Where the boat crushed, the rubble of the amphora form blocks starting at a depth of few meters with individual pieces scattered down to the slope to the depth of around 35 meters where also the massive anchor of the boat can be seen. Behind the schools of two-banded seabreams, large dusky groupers observe the divers and red snappers are common visitors from the deeper zone.

The average depth of the dive is 15 m, while the max is 35 m, appropriate for advanced level divers. The visibility is usually greater than 20 m and temperature ranges between 18-25 °C in summer months, depending on depth. Occasionally a weak current may be encountered at the surface. Boat ride duration 30′.